2013/14 Chanel Métiers d’Art collection titled “Paris-Dallas” and “The Return”

Here we are, finally Karl Lagerfeld’s new film, “The Return”, has ben released in occasion of the 2013/14 Métiers d’Art collection titled “Paris-Dallas”.

Let’s take a look then!

 

 

 

 

 


 

Why Chanel Fell For Dallas

10 DECEMBER 2013
 
ELLA ALEXANDER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TONIGHT Chanel will stage its latest Metiers d’Art show in the perhaps unlikely destination of Dallas, chosen by Karl Lagerfeld himself. But as the brand’s president of fashion, Bruno Pavlovsky, explains the city has much more resonance for the label than you might first think.

“He chooses themes linked to cities that inspire him and are consistent with the brand,” Pavlovsky told us. “They generally have strong ties to Mademoiselle Chanel’s life and inspiration, like London, Moscow, Shanghai, Byzance and Scotland where we held the last Métiers d’art show Paris-Edimbourg. All these places represented something to Mademoiselle Chanel – America, and notably Dallas, are part of our history, the American championed and supported Mademoiselle Chanel in the Fifties. They played a large part in putting Gabrielle Chanel back at the forefront of the international fashion.”

It was the American press, not the British or French, that gave Chanel glowing reviews of her comeback collection in 1954, following her 15-year hiatus. US department store Neiman Marcus, founded in Dallas, was among the most supportive – presenting the designer for an award for her contribution to fashion in 1957.

“The American press and department stores spotted and appreciated the modernity of Mademoiselle Chanel’s collections,” explained Pavlovsky. “Her comfortable suits, for example were a huge success there.”

Chanel’s Metiers d’Art shows are known for being true fashion spectaculars; last season’s took place in in the ruins of Linlithgow Palace, near Edinburgh in Scotland, while pre-spring/summer 2013 saw models walk around a maze of fountains in the palace of Versailles. Why is the scale of the show so important to the brand?

“It is a way of turning our attention to an important market – of offering to our clients there – and often also offering the public – the opportunity to experience the brand in a new way,” said Pavlovsky. “All these events are a way for Chanel to showcase the quality, creativity and sophistication of our collections and products. They allow us to feed the imagination around our collections and the brand.”

Yet despite such high expectations from the fashion press, Pavlovsky never worries that his shows won’t live up to the last.

“With Karl Lagerfeld we have worked together for 20 years now,” he said. “That is a solid basis for confidence.”

 

 

 

source Vogue UK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 years of Chanel Métiers d’Art shows
The first Métiers d’Art Chanel show was held in December 2002, in the Chanel haute couture salons on the rue Cambon. A year later, Chanel Cinq à Sept was shown, followed by the house’s first collection in tribute to a particular city in December 2004, with Paris-Tokyo at Tokyo’s Chanel Ginza building. The following year,Chanel showed in Paris-New York at the Chanel store on 57th Street, before heading a year later to the principality of Monaco with Paris-Monte Carlo at the Monaco Opéra. In 2007, Paris-Londres was shown at 9, Place Howick and in 2008, Paris’ Théâtre Le Ranelagh was the setting for Paris-Moscou. The house looked to the Far East once again in 2009 for Paris-Shanghai at Barge, in Shanghai’s Bund area, followed by Paris-Byzance in December 2010, at the Chanel haute couture salons. A year later the house looked to India forParis-Bombay at the Grand Palais’ Courbe gallery, before heading North in 2012, with Paris-Edimbourg at Linlithgow Palace, near Edinburgh, Scotland.

 

 

Eugénie Trochu, translated by Kate Matthams-Spencer., Rachel Huber, Holly Meehan and Charlotte Sutherland-Hawes
from Vogue France

 

 

 

From left to right: Chanel Paris-Shangai (2009), Chanel Paris-Byzance (2010), Chanel Paris-Bombay (2011) and Chanel Paris-Edimbourg (2012)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Desrues, Costume Jeweler and Accessory Maker

 

A fine jewelry maker and accessory producer since 1936, Desrues has long sculpted, gilded and enameled finely made buttons from its workrooms in northern France. In 1965, owner George Desrues created his first range of buttons for Gabrielle Chanel and in the years that followed, he recreated many of the precious jewelry gifts given to her by the Duke of Westminster. In 1985, the house’s founder passed the reins of the business over to Chanel itself. Since then, Karl Lagerfeld and around 100 employees have continued to work to maintain the high level of craftsmanship and artistry established by Desrues. The result, is a daily output of 4,000 buttons and eight annual jewelry collections, made up of 100 finely crafted pieces.

 

Eugénie Trochu, translated by Kate Matthams-Spencer., Rachel Huber, Holly Meehan and Charlotte Sutherland-Hawes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lemarié, Feather and Flower Maker

 

Founded during the Belle Epoque when fashion dictated that hats featured an aviary’s worth of feathers, Lemarié remains to this day a Parisian fashion institution. During the 1950s, the house began working with couture designers, bringing everything from peacock, to swan and ostrich feathers to creations by Balenciaga, Nina Ricci, Christian Dior and Chanel. Soon after, the house added flowers to its portfolio, transforming organza, tulle, velvet and muslin into roses, orchids and dahlias of all sizes. It wasn’t long after that Gabrielle Chanel sent the company an order to fashion a fabric camellia for a collection and the rest, as they say, is fashion history. Today, the camellia with its 16 petal design is widely recognized as the floral symbol of the Chanel house and continues to be invented and reinvented by Lemarié’s craftsmen. In 1996, Lemarié became a Chanel Métiers D’Art partner.

 

Eugénie Trochu, translated by Kate Matthams-Spencer., Rachel Huber, Holly Meehan and Charlotte Sutherland-Hawes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Massaro, Bootmaker

 

As a storied master boot maker in operation since 1894, Massaro has been known to provide shoes to some of the biggest fashion icons in history. With the likes of Marlène Dietrich, Barbara Hutton, Elizabeth Taylorand Romy Schneider all slipping into the company’s shoes, it comes as no surprise that the house has for many years also supplied Chanel with its masterfully shaped shoes. It was in 1957 that Raymond Massaro, grandson of the original owner and founder created the very first beige Chanel shoe, that with the black toecap was to become a sartorial hit. While fashions of the time had women walking in vertiginous stiletto heels,  Massaro and Chanel broke with convention, offering soft beige leather shoe with a 6cm heel that gave wearers unprecedented elegant freedom of movement. In 2002, Massaro joined the Chanel family and the Métiers d’Art and as such, continues to create everything from classic heels to statement-making PVC shoes, cork-soled sandals and thigh-high boots.

 

Eugénie Trochu, translated by Kate Matthams-Spencer., Rachel Huber, Holly Meehan and Charlotte Sutherland-Hawes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesage, Embroiderer

 

In 1924, the Lesage family took over the Michonet embroidery studio, supplier to Madeleine Vionnet, Charles Frederic Worth, Jeanne Paquin and other major fashion names. Lesage soon gained a reputation as the house behind the avant-garde motifs of designer Elsa Schiaparelli, including embroidery around the themes of the circus, signs of the zodiacs and sea shells. During the 1950s, the reins passed to François Lesage and the studio created embroidery for Pierre Balmain, Cristobal Balenciaga, Christian Dior, Hubert de Givenchy, Yves Saint Laurent and Christian Lacroix. With more than 60,000 embroidery samples in its archives, thousands of motifs and work featuring diamante, beads and precious stones, Lesage holds one of the biggest collections in the world. In 1992, Lesage founded its own embroidery school and joined the house of Chanel in 2002, to preserve and continue its exceptional craft and expertise.

 

Eugénie Trochu, translated by Kate Matthams-Spencer., Rachel Huber, Holly Meehan and Charlotte Sutherland-Hawes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goossens, Jeweler and Goldsmith

 

Robert Goossens met Gabrielle Chanel in 1953, just three years after Goossens was born. Impressed by his craftsmanship inspired by the Ancient world, Byznatium and Egypt, the designer immediately entrusted him with the role of official supplier for the house of Chanel. As one of the greatest jewelers and goldsmiths in Paris, Robert Goossens created pieces in silver and gold-plated bronze, featuring semi-precious stones, quartz and cultured pearls for the French house. Today, its under the direction of Patrick Goossens, son of the Maison Goossens founder and has been one of the 11 ateliers of Chanel‘s Métiers d’Art since 2005.

 

Eugénie Trochu, translated by Kate Matthams-Spencer., Rachel Huber, Holly Meehan and Charlotte Sutherland-Hawes

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maison Michel, Milliner

 

First established by Auguste Michel in 1936, Maison Michel rose to roaring success in the 1970s, when milliners Pierre and Claudine Debard took the helm. Designers of hats and other hair accessories, they sparked a whole new generation of milliners who went on to work for Dior, Givenchy, Yves Saint Laurent and later,Karl Lagerfeld, for Chanel. In 1997, Maison Michel became one of Chanel’s first Métiers d’Art subsidiaries, designing many extraordinary pieces that became focal points in the brand’s collections. Maison Michel has brought out a new range of hats and hair accessories every season since designer Laetitia Crahay took the reins in 2006.

 

Eugénie Trochu, translated by Kate Matthams-Spencer., Rachel Huber, Holly Meehan and Charlotte Sutherland-Hawes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guillet, Corsage and Floral Decoration maker

 

Master corsage-maker since 1896, Guillet re-imagines daisies, forget-me-nots, jasmine, roses, lily of the valley and gerberas as hairpieces, tiaras and crowns for the biggest couture houses at show time. Woven into silk, organza, muslin, lacquered lace and gold chain, the petals and leaves become become veritable vegetal jewelry. A Chanel Métiers d’Art house since 2006, Guillet has created all of the floral accessories for the label’s recent shows.

 

Eugénie Trochu, translated by Kate Matthams-Spencer., Rachel Huber, Holly Meehan and Charlotte Sutherland-Hawes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Montex, Embroiderer

 

A specialist in tambour or Lunéville beading, in which a hooked needle is used to thread beads, galons, sequins and other materials onto single chain stitches, after fabric has been pre-pierced with a cornely, Montex was founded in 1939. Close to Karl Lagerfeld for many years, the house also sews, piques and embroiders for other major couture houses. Today, Montex is led by embroiderer emeritus Annie Trussart.

 

Eugénie Trochu, translated by Kate Matthams-Spencer., Rachel Huber, Holly Meehan and Charlotte Sutherland-Hawes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Causse, Glove maker

 

Founded in French luxury glove capital Millau in 1892, Causse has been creating couture riffs on the cold weather essential since its inception. More than mere winter warmers, these are gloves designed to decorate the hand, crafted from the finest leathers and rarest animal skins. Embellished with precious stones, lace and fine trim, Causse gloves have accessorized several Chanel collections on the runway since the company became a Métiers d’Art house in 2012.

 

Eugénie Trochu, translated by Kate Matthams-Spencer., Rachel Huber, Holly Meehan and Charlotte Sutherland-Hawes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barrie Knitwear, Cashmere producer

 

On December 4 last year in Linlithgow castle to the west of Edinburgh, the Chanel Métier d’art Paris-Edimbourg show was held in the birthplace of Mary, Queen of Scots. The show was an homage to Barrie Knitwear, the company specializing in cashmere which was purchased by Chanel the very same year and became a Métiers d’Art company. The Scottish knitwear house was founded more than 140 years ago and initially produced sweaters for the British army during the two world wars, before going on to be one of the favorite suppliers to the biggest name in couture in the 1950s and 1960s.

 

Eugénie Trochu, translated by Kate Matthams-Spencer., Rachel Huber, Holly Meehan and Charlotte Sutherland-Hawes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lognon, Pleater

 

Lognon has specialized in fabric pleating since 1945, a unique expertise that combines hand-crafting with work in cardboard and steam-setting to create perfect pleats. Directed by Gerard Lognon for the past 68 years, the French house joined Chanel‘s Métiers d’Art in 2013 in a natural step for both houses, as Lognon pleating had already been used for many years by Chanel.

 

Eugénie Trochu, translated by Kate Matthams-Spencer., Rachel Huber, Holly Meehan and Charlotte Sutherland-Hawes

 

 

 

 

 

 

source Vogue Paris

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Fern

    Amazing!